Margaret and Gryphon in the Forest

 

FGWp18An illustration from The Fierce & Gentle Wolf. I used white neocolore crayon over paint to create the mist rising from the ground. All three of the recent books I have been involved in working on have children lost amongst trees. I like walking in woods rather than in open ground, the trees this time of year are interesting to look at, changing colour, and more sparsely leafed; and the bark grows beautiful lichen. I am starting to collect images here and there for Finn’s House.

The Midnight Hare: The First Image

 

First scribbleThis was the first scribble I did on brown paper, and I knew at once that this was the feeling I wanted for the book. Maybe I should have kept this colour as the background throughout, and painted on single sheets, crossing over both pages so as to have kept the design more coherent, instead of it being a tad hit and miss.  Also I like the texture of this paper, but it is obvious from the crinkles that it is too thin for water-based paint. However this is all water under the bridge. I always like to learn. For a couple of days now my mind has been switching on to the new book. This entry is a kind of acknowledgement that I need to do some more publicity next week.

I came across some beautiful photographs by Michal Iwanowski, this image of trees (see below) has exactly the feeling that I want in the new illustrations, when Finn, the protagonist, gets lost in the woods just beyond his house.  I am going to put in a small image here; I am wary of using other people’s work, and the context is quite different, but this way down the page I don’t think showing this image is too invasive of copyright/privacy/another person’s work.  The photographs can be seen on the Edge of Humanity WordPress site. Of course I will be using the landscape round here, and my own photographs, as one shouldn’t us someone else’s work out of the context in which they created it; but the images of Michal Iwanowski will be at the back of my mind. When I was thinking about the illustration, there were silver birches and darkness; but this photograph is just something else:

woods